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British Archaeology – Latest Issue 169 (Nov/Dec 2019)

£6.00 £4.50

Introducing the November/December issue of British Archaeology

Cover Story – Chew Valley Hoard

British Museum curator Gareth Williams explains the historic significance of an exceptional hoard of coins buried in Somerset shortly after the Battle of Hastings. We also consider issues raised by the retrieval of such a find by detectorists without archaeological training: should the Portable Antiquities Scheme be better funded?

Other Stories:

  • Staffordshire Hoard
  • Duddon valley
  • Poole logboat
  • Uffington White Horse
  • Archaeologists on the riverbank
  • Mudlarking

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Description

ON THE COVER

Chew Valley Hoard

British Museum curator Gareth Williams explains the historic significance of an exceptional hoard of coins buried in Somerset shortly after the Battle of Hastings. We also consider issues raised by the retrieval of such a find by detectorists without archaeological training: should the Portable Antiquities Scheme be better funded?

AMONG OTHER STORIES

Staffordshire Hoard

Ten years ago a detectorist found the largest known hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver. Ahead of the definitive report, Chris Fern, academic lead on the Staffordshire Hoard project, describes the results of his research

Duddon valley

They went looking for Vikings and found late medieval houses – one of which had been raised on a Bronze Age platform. We report on a community project in the Cumbrian fells

Poole logboat

Found on the Dorset coast half a century ago, an Iron Age logboat survived thanks to local initiatives. It was re-displayed in 2007 and has been newly analysed. We tell the story of one of Britain’s largest known prehistoric watercraft

Uffington White Horse

Perhaps the oldest surviving land art in the world, the White Horse of Uffington has fascinated and puzzled observers for centuries. David Miles puts his own scientific revelations into historic context

Archaeologists on the riverbank

We review some key remains recorded by the Thames Discovery Programme, founded ten years ago to bring understanding and enjoyment of the historic river Thames to the widest possible audience

Mudlarking

Over two centuries mudlarking on the Thames foreshore has risen from scavenging by some of London’s poorest to a leisure activity that is amassing artefacts lost by the city’s inhabitants. Lara Maiklem knows more about it than most

REGULARS INCLUDE

* News

Could there be another superhenge in Wiltshire?

* Letters

Accessing excavation data, and Marlowe’s lost grave

* Greg Bailey on TV

Raiders of the Lost Past is better than its title

* Sharp focus

The Tarr Steps

* Correspondent

How the Young Archaeologists’ Club engages young people

* Casefiles

Eastney Beach anti-tank defences

* Books

D-Day remains, and sculptures in Canterbury Cathedral

* Spoilheap

Beware far-right interest in heritage

* Briefing

The UK’s only archaeological events listing, with exhibition reviews

 

British Archaeology is a bimonthly members’ magazine that is also available in newsagents, and by subscription in print and digital