British Archaeology – Back Issue 118 (May/Jun 2011)

£6.00

COVER STORY

A recurrent theme in this issue is how archaeology today wants you to be part of the quest, which we have reflected in the cover design (featuring my aged and much-travelled trowel!). This is another magazine to read from front to back, with much new, topical and thought-provoking stuff.

Best wishes

Mike Pitts (Editor)

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COVER STORY

A recurrent theme in this issue is how archaeology today wants you to be part of the quest, which we have reflected in the cover design (featuring my aged and much-travelled trowel!). This is another magazine to read from front to back, with much new, topical and thought-provoking stuff.

Best wishes

Mike Pitts (Editor)

 

HUMAN REMAINS TO BE RETAINED

British Archaeology has learnt that after reviewing the 1857 Burial Act, the Ministry of Justice has decided that archaeologists in England and Wales will not now routinely be required to rebury all excavated human remains. Last year BA launched a campaign requesting re-interpretation of the law, and in February 40 archaeology professors wrote to the secretary of state for justice seeking long-term retention of remains. That wish appears to have been granted.

KENT PLOUGH FIND CHALLENGES FARMING HISTORY

A coulter – a large iron blade, part of a “heavy” plough – from Lyminge, Kent, is set to open up a new debate about the history of the British landscape. Excavated by Reading University archaeologists last summer, it was found on the floor of a seventh century Anglo-Saxon building. Accepted history says the heavy plough, known in Roman Britain, fell out of use after AD410 and did not return until the later 10th century. Its re-appearance is held to be a key factor in the growth of medieval farming, but the new find suggests Anglo-Saxon farming was more advanced than thought

OVERTHROWING EGYPT’S PAST

Egypt’s ancient past was caught up in the revolution. Our look at Egypt now includes an exclusive eyewitness account and photos by archaeologist Heinrich Härke, of events in Cairo as protest began in late January; a diary of incidents affecting the Egyptian Museum and ancient sites; and an exclusive English translation of a message sent to newly re-appointed antiquities minister Zahi Hawass by Dr Hany Hanna, Supreme Council of Antiquities, asking that corruption be swept away from the world of Egyptian archaeology

THE BIG DIG: GOUGH’S CAVE

Major feature that puts the world’s oldest directly dated skull-cups into context, by Silvia Bello, Simon Parfitt and Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum

6 THREATENED SITES

Across the UK and Ireland, excavation funding is falling; archaeologists are losing their jobs. But the unrecorded past is still there, and building, farming, roadworks and many other forces relentlessly wipe the record. We feature six typical sites that are being or may soon be destroyed. They range from traces of 8,000-year-old hunter-gatherers to a world war two bomb shelter, and none can be saved by professional archaeologists on their own

ELIZABETH WATTS INTERVIEW

The soprano praised for her voice and stage presence has a degree in archaeology, and nearly went on to research cognitive evolution. She explains why archaeology still matters to her, and confesses about a student excavation

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

The archaeological quest for Greek royalty

The story behind a new must-see exhibition in the Ashmolean Museum

Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland

Investigations at the medieval chapel of St Oswald

The National Lottery’s gift to heritage

The HLF has more money than it had expected to have

Mick’s travels

Mick Aston visits monastic ruins in France and on the Welsh border

Letters

Nuclear power – lessons from the past

Spoilheap

How to brand archaeology? Not as consultants

Television

Greg Bailey struggles with the History Channel’s Mud Men

On the web

Where to dig? And a new South Downs National Park website

Books

Roman imperialism, Roman myths and the Thames valley

CBA Correspondent

The Marsh Archaeology Award honours heritage volunteers

Briefing

The only up to date guide to fieldwork, courses and conferences

Britain in archaeology

What’s been in the archaeological news that matters

First sight

Fabulous full-page photo of a Roman glass beaker

Phase 2

References to several earlier BA features now published fully elsewhere

Editorial

A new, people’s archaeology beckons

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