British Archaeology – Back Issue 126 (Sep/Oct 2012)

£6.00

Solving the great rock art mystery

Rock art’s on natural boulders all over Britain, especially in northern England and Scotland. But who made it and why seemed impossible to answer – and the designs are abstract, so they don’t help. Excavations at Kilmartin, Argyll, have found some answers. The art it is older than expected, dating from the time of Stonehenge.

In stock

Description

ON THE COVER

Solving the great rock art mystery
Rock art’s on natural boulders all over Britain, especially in northern England and Scotland. But who made it and why seemed impossible to answer – and the designs are abstract, so they don’t help. Excavations at Kilmartin, Argyll, have found some answers. The art it is older than expected, dating from the time of Stonehenge

AMONG OTHER STORIES

JAMES BOND IN NORFOLK
We heard in the last edition how in the 1950s a French MI5 agent discovered Corsica’s archaeology. At the same time another wartime intelligence officer – Ian Fleming – was visiting a Mediterranean excavation, and metal detecting in Norfolk. In this extraordinary true episode, the lines between novelist, archaeologist and Sunday Times executive, and the fictional James Bond, were not always clearly drawn

WHY WAS MAJOR ANCIENT SITE “LOST” IN BOG?
In 2010 there was an exceptional archaeological site outside Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh – a ninth century crannog, a small artificial island that may have been the residence of a high status chief. In July 2012 British Archaeology was told that it “cannot now be preserved”, after engineering works associated with a new road went wrong. Yet proper procedure had supposedly been followed by government archaeologists. What happened? Most of the people we interviewed for this story sought anonymity, and questions remain unanswered

HISTORY HIDDEN IN THE FOREST
Lidar is a technology that uses lasers from aeroplanes to create images of the ground below that look like black and white photos. It can reveal previously unseen archaeological remains – and it can see through trees. A major survey of the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire found many new sites. Excavation on the ground turned curiosities seen from the air into significant discoveries

EXAVATING LARGEST EVER CELTIC COIN HOARD
In June thousands of Celtic coins were found in Jersey. One of the leading students of such coins happens to live and work in the Channel Islands – Philip de Jersey. He helped recover the haul, and he describes the experience exclusively for British Archaeology

THE SECRET HILL
The Cold War is remembered more for propaganda and spy fiction than military hardware and office buildings. Yet physical remains are today often key documents of an era that shaped our times. Archaeologists have been exploring the remains of the Teufelsberg, one of the west’s most important electronic listening and intelligence gathering posts behind the iron curtain

CROSSING THE CHANNEL WITH THE DOVER BOAT
The Dover bronze age boat, a beautifully preserved complex craft made around 1550BC, was found 20 years ago. We look back at its discovery, and
at a new project to create a working replica. The revelations are far from over

REGULARS INCLUDE

* Mick’s travels
Mick Aston goes in search of Norman architecture in Worcestershire
* Spoilheap
What does an archaeologist think of Jeremy Deller’s bouncy henge?
* Greg Bailey on TV
Time Team in Dorset
* Letters
On the trail of an archaeological poet
* My archaeology
Diarmaid Walshe, archaeologist and soldier
* Science
New techniques tell fascinating story of crop migrations
* Books
Industrial archaeology, Britain’s Romans and Hallaton treasure
* Briefing
The UK’s only archaeological events listing, with exhibition reviews
* CBA Correspondent
Gill Chitty considers tries to find ethnic diversity in archaeology
* Casefiles
Ynysangharad Lido – a bit of the Med in Pontypridd

You may also like…