British Archaeology – Back Issue 132

£6.00

Cover story: Mick Aston

We present Mick’s final column (on the Isle of Purbeck in Dorset, the last in a series that began in 2006); a personal piece in his own words gathered from some of the many articles he wrote; Greg Bailey on Mick’s relationship with the TV industry; and an overview of his archaeological career and impact.

In stock

Description

Introducing the September/October 2013 edition of British Archaeology

Cover story: Mick Aston

We present Mick’s final column (on the Isle of Purbeck in Dorset, the last in a series that began in 2006); a personal piece in his own words gathered from some of the many articles he wrote; Greg Bailey on Mick’s relationship with the TV industry; and an overview of his archaeological career and impact.

Other stories:

  • WAS STONEHENGE EVER A COMPLETE CIRCLE?
    The question was first asked in the 18th century, then largely forgotten. But in recent years archaeologists have been debating the case, and some now believe the great sarsen lintelled “ring” was in fact only a partial circle, with several stones needed to complete it missing. However, new evidence seems for the first time to prove it was complete. Sophisticated geophysics and centuries of surveys failed, but the hot summer stepped in, revealing an arc of four missing stone pits in the parched grass
  • DEATH AND THE ANGLO-SAXON MOTHER
    Many of us benefit from medical facilities unavailable for most of human history, not least those that ameliorate the dangers of childbirth. We describe the tragic, and shocking, physical evidence for Anglo-Saxon maternal mortality
  • ROMAN BRITAIN … AS YOU’VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE
    A major project is underway to reconsider rural Roman Britain, using the mass of new data from two decades of commercial excavation. We reveal the first results, from the east of England
  • HOLY WELLS
    Braving vegetation, road traffic, bogs, cattle and dogs, Mike Ings has been tracking down traditional holy wells as part of a survey across the whole of Wales
  • BROXMOUTH
    A community settled on a low hill near Edinburgh around 600BC. Here it stayed through the generations, with changes in housing and the walls that enclosed it, and arrangements for disposing its dead. By AD200 the people had gone. Their fascinating story is only now being revealed, with analysis of a major excavation conducted in the 1970s
  • THE CHESIL IRON AGE MIRROR
    Decorated metal mirrors, a late flourish of accomplished prehistoric smithing that was soon transformed by Roman culture, are unique to Britain. A fine specimen was found in Dorset in 2004. In 2011 a second was discovered close by. The archaeologists who excavated the grave found by a metal detectorist tell the story
  • CATCHING THE  LIGHT: BLACK &  WHITE
    Mick Sharp has worked as a photographer for over 40 years, featuring archaeological subjects from the Isle of Skye to Iraq. In the first of three articles he shares his experiences of shooting with monochrome film

Plus regular features:

  • Spoilheap
    Viewers want The White Queen to be Time Team
  • Letters
    And another Stonehenge story: the view pictured in the official guidebook that never existed
  • Books
    Men from the Ministry and Viking jewellery
  • Briefing
    The UK’s only archaeological events listing, with exhibition reviews
  • Correspondent
    The community solution to a shrinking archaeological profession
  • Casefiles
    St Catherin’s Island, Pembrokeshire

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “British Archaeology – Back Issue 132”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like…